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SPA 321: Faces of Spain, Spring 2020: Citing Your Sources

Who's Citing This Source?

Google Scholar has a useful feature: If you plug in the author and title of a book or article, it links you to newer publications that have cited it. This is a cool way to see how influential a particular work has been and to see how others have drawn on it. 

Tracing Cited Sources

One of the most powerful ways to find valuable sources and assess their signifcance is to follow the breadcrumb trail left by scholars in their published work. When researchers cite sources, they are bolstering their argument by providing evidence, but also pointing readers to places they can go for more information. Take them up on it!

In addition to references in books and articles, the bibliographies found in specialized reference works will point you to the most significant research on a topic, an efficient shortcut to the best stuff.

Once you see a reference that looks good, how do you get your hands on it? Here's a quick checklist.

  • Is the reference to a book? Search the title of the book in the library catalog.
  • Is the reference to a chapter or essay in a book? Check the book title in the library catalog (not the title of the essay).
  • Is the reference to a journal article? Search for the title of the journal in the Journals List (not the title of the article).
  • Did you strike out? Request it through Interlibrary Loan.
  • Not sure what it is? Ask at the reference desk.

Ask Us!

Fall 2020 reference (research) help:

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